Courses offered Summer 2017

Field Archaeology

Instructor: 


June 15 - July 10, 2020

8:00am - 5:00pm 

Nature of cultural and environmental evidence in archaeology, how such evidence is used to model past human behavior and land use; emphasis on Iowa prehistory; basic reconnaissance surveying, excavation techniques.

The 2020 Lakeside Laboratory archaeological field school will continue on-going research efforts in the Iowa Great Lakes region including excavations at a Woodland era sites (13DK143) at Mini Wakan State Park adjacent to Big Spirit Lake.  Previous Lakeside Laboratory summer archaeological field schools have investigated late prehistoric/protohistoric Oneota tradition sites since 1995 and Woodland adaptations since 2014, recovering large assemblages of diverse materials including arrow and spear points and other stone tools, decorated ceramic sherds, copper fragments, bison bones and other faunal remains, and worked catlinite and glass trade beads. Features related to semi-subterranean houses including hearths, storage, and refuse pits will be investigated as opportunity permits.

As this is primarily a field course, excavation and mapping notes as well as recording of general observations while digging will be required. Lab processing forms will also be completed by field school participants. No formal tests or writing assignments are required beyond the field notebooks (which will include building an annotated bibliography from pertinent source materials provided by the instructor).

Participants will be introduced to the essential methods of field archaeology including artifact identification, site mapping, excavation techniques, artifact processing, and beginning analytical methods. The field school will include lectures on Iowa archaeology and the culture history sequence of western Iowa as well as day trips to the Sanford Museum in Cherokee, Iowa and the Dixon Oneota site, and possibly the Blood Run National Historic Landmark, Jeffers Petroglyphs, and Pipestone National Monument.

Introduction to Geographical Information Systems-GIS

Dates: 
Jul 24 to Aug 4
Instructors: 
,


May 18 - 29, 2020

8:00am - 5:00pm 

Scientific introduction at intermediate level to ecology and evolution of important groups of organisms: algae to vertebrates, different ecological phenomena (e.g., fire and climate change), varying landforms, different ecosystems (e.g., prairies and aquatic systems); emphasis on sustainability with introduction to concepts, issues, and practices; ability to communicate environmental information through a variety of means.

This introductory course provides the history, purpose, functionality and basic uses of geographical information systems (GIS) as a tool for demonstrating information in relation to locations on the earth and moments in time. While map data may often serve as the basis for using or understanding geographical information, more complex data and systems may be analyzed using GIS tools to grow understanding of geographical phenomena. For the sake of consistency, ArcGIS tools will be used to familiarize students with the basic application and function of GIS technology in relation to data.

The major goals of the course are to: Understand the basic functionality of GIS software using ESRI tools; and apply this knowledge to real-world problems. By the end of the two-week course, students should be able to:

  • Successfully navigate ArcGIS software to perform basic map building and data management.
  • Apply GIS techniques to questions related to human and environmental challenges.

Natural History Workshop- Field Archaeology

Dates: 
Jun 19 to Jun 23
Instructor: 

A specific aspect of the upper Midwest's natural history, or techniques for studying natural history; amphibians and reptiles, birds and birding, nature photography, mushrooms and other fungi, Iowa's trees and forests, fish biology, prairies, common algae, common insects, aquatic plants, life in rivers, life in lakes, mosses and liverworts, natural history of Iowa Great Lakes region, field archaeology, scuba diving, astronomy, nature sketching; five-day, nontechnical introductions.

*This course is offered in one and two-week sessions (1 semester hour of academic credit/week of coursework and course attendance).
June 22 - June 26, 2020     1-week course
June 22 - July 3, 2020        2-week course

The 2020 Lakeside Laboratory archaeological field school will continue on-going research efforts in the Iowa Great Lakes region including excavations at a Woodland era site within the
Mini-Wakan State Park adjacent to Spirit Lake. Previous Lakeside Laboratory summer archaeological field schools have investigated late prehistoric/protohistoric Oneota tradition sites since 1995 and Woodland adaptations since 2014, recovering large assemblages of diverse materials including arrow and spear points and other stone tools, decorated ceramic sherds, copper fragments, bison bones and other faunal remains, and worked catlinite and glass trade beads. Features related to semi-subterranean houses includinghearths, storage, and refuse pits will be investigated as opportunity permits.

Assignments: As this is primarily a field course, excavation and mapping notes as well as recording of general observations while digging will be required. Lab processing forms will also be completed by field school
participants. No formal tests or writing assignments are required beyond the field notebooks (which will include building an annotated bibliography from pertinent source materials provided by the instructor).

Course Objectives: Participants will be introduced to the essential methods of field archaeology including artifact identification, site mapping, excavation techniques, artifact processing, and beginning analytical
methods. The field school will include lectures on Iowa archaeology and the culture history sequence of western Iowa as well as day trips to the Sanford Museum in Cherokee, Iowa and the Dixon Oneota site, and possibly the
Blood Run National Historic Landmark, Jeffers Petroglyphs, and Pipestone National Monument.

Required Course Materials: AT LAKESIDE LAB: many articles, texts, manuscripts, and reports pertinent to the archaeology of Northwest Iowa will be available for use by the course participants.

Textbook to Purchase: There is one required text for those signing up for the full four-week session (a used copy from Amazon.com is recommended): Hester, Thomas R., Harry J. Shafer, and Kenneth L. Feder. 1997. Field
Methods in Archaeology. 7th Edition. Mayfield Publishing Company, Mountain View California. [ISBN No.: 1- 55934-799-6 paperback]

Equipment: This is a field course so be prepared to be outside all day. Sunscreen, hat, rain gear, and good footwear (no open toe sandals) are required. Excavation and surveying equipment will be provided.